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  • What We Do

    Our challenge is to maintain the quality of the Kinnickinnic River as the population of River Falls and the surrounding townships grows. The Kinnickinnic River Land Trust protects land in ways that no other organization can. It works cooperatively with landowners and the community to protect the resources that we all value: clean water, wildlife, family recreation, natural areas, wild trout, and farms.

    Accomplishments

    • In September 2007, protected a 195 acre farm along the lower Kinni River through the purchase of a conservation easement.
    • As of September 2007, over 2,000 acres of land and 8 miles of riverbank are protected in the watershed through the efforts of KRLT.
    • In June, 2007, protected 45.5 acres, through fee title purchase, in the lower Kinni canyon.
    • In late 2006, added nearly 39 acres of the former Rasmussen Preserve to the Kinnickinnic State Park, including historic remnants of a dam serving the 1850 Clifton Hollow settlement.
    • In 2007, the KRLT had 56 Business and Organization Members and over 550 total memberships.
    • Recipient of the River Alliance of Wisconsin’s Decade River Champion Award in the “Local Guardian-Organization” category.
    • Nominated for the River Falls Chamber of Commerce 2005 Small Business of the Year.
    • Worked with Twin Cities Trout Unlimited to provide river protection language in the 2005 adopted City of River Falls Comprehensive Plan.
    • Continue restoration and maintenance of native prairie at the Kelly Creek Preserve.
    • Teachers, students and Leadership River Falls utilize the Kelly Creek Preserve for field studies, service learning projects, and knowledge of the community’s natural resources.
    • Continue to work with local landowners to restore native prairie, savanna and woodland communities.
    • Conduct annual field trips, giving members and the public the opportunity to visit and learn about lands protected by the KRLT.
    • In 2005 and 2006 worked with 7 area local schools to install rain gardens. The project involved over 700 students, 15 teachers, 32 volunteers and 120 volunteer hours. A brochure about the rain garden project was sent to all Wisconsin schools in 2007.